CBC News: U.S. Bracing for Iran’s Response

Recently, Cytelligence CEO Daniel Tobok sat down with CBC’s Natasha Fatah to discuss Iran’s capabilities when it comes to attacking U.S. sites and infrastructure.

Natasha Fatah:
A relatively unknown site in the U.S., all of a sudden has an image of President Donald Trump being punched His face is bloodied and the word Iran is there, we don’t know who is responsible for it but when you saw that image and you saw the story. What did you think?

Daniel Tobok:
I mean this is a typical way of retaliation today, of course, Iranian hackers have taken the credit for the formation of that particular website there’s still there’s not enough proof to prove that it’s them. But this is, I think one of many that are about to come down, down the pipeline to show different U.S websites that are going to be taken over by various type of hackers.

Natasha Fatah:
Okay, what leads you to say that that this is just one if it is, in fact, Iran that was behind it. What would actual attacks by Iran in terms of cyber threats look like?

Daniel Tobok:
Absolutely, going back a little bit down memory lane, in 2010 when the stuxnet virus had taken over some of the nuclear facilities by Iran. Iran has basically fallen to make a major investment into cyber, cyber threats and cyber warfare versus any type of kinetic answering where there’s actual missiles or actually troops on the ground. So what we’re seeing is the cyberware for army, getting to work and a lot of occurred, a couple days ago with SS nation of the general basically one of the tactics says is to deface websites, and that is to show a form of superiority that they’re able to do that, you know, was kind of a little bit of a slap in the face that we were able to get into the infrastructure, but it’s not necessarily the infrastructure in this particular cases the website, so it doesn’t mean that actually have access to data, but I think as part of their strategy is that when I try to get access to data in particular infrastructures seize operations, cause havoc all in retaliation for the actions.

Natasha Fatah:
One would think that the United States would be well equipped to be able to counter any such attacks, is the U.S. vulnerable?

Daniel Tobok:
So the U.S. definitely has vulnerabilities and, you know, I always said the large organizations such as the FBI, CIA other various government organizations have lots of funding and they’re very well protected. It’s the businesses and the smaller organizations that have more vulnerabilities. One of the biggest issues in the U.S. is the fact that the internet is not controlled by the government. For example, like in Iran. So there’s a lot more freedom and with freedom comes vulnerabilities, so there will be attacks and there will be successful attacks but unfortunately by the Iranian government.

Natasha Fatah:
Now, what do you think? Would those attacks be inconveniences, or do you think they could be dangerous?

Daniel Tobok:
So some of them could be dangerous. I think it’s going to fall into three categories. The first category is just to cause nuisance and basically deface websites with no actual harm, it’s really more of an embarrassment. Number two will be actually theft of data and seize of infrastructure so if they for example going to try to shut up the utilities, you know the heating energy, you know, oil that’s going to have disruption for business and destruction of machines and potentially loss of human life. And then of course, what they’ve been also doing for the past nine years, which is a revenue generation where through their attacks and through ransomware, they’re able to actually cause financial impacts to the environment.

Natasha Fatah:
Okay, it’s frightening stuff let’s see what happens in the days and weeks ahead Daniel thank you so much for your time.

Watch the full interview here